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Content curation: how we choose the subject of our weekly newsletter

Every week, we send out our newsletter.

The concept is simple: Monday, 6AM, one article to read.

In short, every Monday morning, we recommend a must-read article (only one). A relevant article that can talk about branded content, content marketing, television, management, etc.

I’m the one who prepares this newsletter, usually at the last minute, on Sunday evening. But the process will have lasted all week. Here’s how it goes.

(I’ll dive into details in this post, because it’s a question that I often get asked)

1. The constant scanning

The initial source is composed of Facebook, Twitter and a list of over 400 blogs that was compiled over many years (since 2006 actually). Although all these sources aren’t active on a daily basis, these blogs publish well over 3,500 articles per week. That’s a lot. I scan about 80% of the titles of these articles using many tools. My favourite is Feedly (a very powerful curation tool).

I’ll be scanning my list of unread articles multiple times a day, here and there. Just to know what’s happening.

2. My first selection

From this initial “scan”, I’ll usually select about 50 (sometimes close to a 100) articles that I will share via Twitter every week. You can actually follow me on Twitter if you’d like to see the “raw” list of articles I find relevant (but keep in mind these are personal choices). I take great care in choosing articles that have a descriptive title, a title that represents what you’ll be reading. The idea is that in the end, you could basically see what are hot topics and trends simply by reading the titles of these chosen articles.

3. Monitoring interest

Throughout the week, I also track which shared articles generate the most interest (clicks, retweets, etc.). This will be an indicator to know what could be interesting to send the following Monday.

4. The final choice (always at the last minute…)

On Sunday evening, ususally while I’m watching television, I’ll jump up from my seat and realize I should be preparing tomorrow morning’s newsletter. That’s when I choose the article I’ll be recommending, a result of the week that just passed, conversations I had with colleagues and partners, and the ongoing monitoring of what we shared.

In  the end, it becomes a weekly newsletter that I hope is appreciated, read and shared.

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