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Tourism and the evolution of content

Tourism has been one of the most impacted industries in 2020. As the recovery seems to be longer than anyone would want, content producers are playing an important role.

Airlines might be able to fly their planes, and hotels might be able to welcome some guests, but travel is far from what it was in the 2010s.

The stay-at-home economy and the sheltering-in-place orders here and there across the world have only made people crave travelling even more.

This has set the groundwork for the creation of new tourism experiences, a lot of them based on content creators that allow people to travel without actually being there (for now).

From live streaming visits in remote locations to virtual reality packages, experience companies are adapting and creating ways of discovering the world that, I believe, will absolutely survive the current state of the situation.

For example, it is possible to participate in guided chocolate tastings with chocolate shipped before the tour, but also browse a myriad of ways to travel without traveling with the launch of Amazon Explore, which offers everything from online shopping tours in Peru to tango lessons in Argentina.

Content producers are crafting experiences that would be hard to do in real-life, creating exclusivity in possibilities.

This is one great way content can help the tourism industry now, but for the future also.

Have you tried similar experiences lately?

You can read a very interesting New York Times article on the subject, complete with examples and a bit more depth on how tourism destinations are tackling this.